Sarah Ann Hall

Reporting on writing in progress or, more probably, not.

Posts Tagged ‘family

#FridayFictioneers – 19/1/18 – Indubitable

with 47 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I’m not at all sure about the below story. The idea is sound; I feel I failed in the execution as I’ve not had the time to edit I’d’ve liked. Critique away.

© J Hardy Carroll

 

Indubitable

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

Adele was born ten minutes before Sue.

They shared school, friends, clothes, growing pains, boyfriends.

Love and marriage divided them when job and husband took them to different ends of the country. Post and phone united them as they relayed new experiences in food and music. Some believed they communicated telepathically, which explained how Sue knew Adele was pregnant before she did.

Throughout life they found it almost impossible to argue, always knowing what the other thought and why.

Now, as Adele holds Sue’s hand, watching her fluttering eyelids, she wonders how she’ll survive when Sue’s chest ceases to rise.

 

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Written by Sarah Ann

January 19, 2018 at 8:39 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 15/12/17 – Clearing Sand

with 26 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I haven’t had my head buried in sand the past two weeks, but I might as well have done for the use it’s been. Time has run away from me and I’ve not been writing as I should. Hopefully, things are calmer and I’ll resume normal service, but then again what’s normal? Where do you go with Sandra’s photo this week? I know how I got here, but it is a little tangential, after all it’s what you see… and this is a vignette not a story, but it is something.

Thank you Rochelle for hosting.

 

Clearing Sand

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

‘Head the size of a planet.’

‘And the ego to match.’

‘Yeah, but we love him.’

‘Do we?’

‘Sometimes.’ Esther thought of her father and how she truly felt. ‘He’s an arrogant bastard who drives me nuts.’

‘Your counselling’s working.’

‘It is Mum,’ Esther smiled. ‘How about yours?’

‘It’s going well. I recognise your father as a miserable old man; one that I still love.’

‘Enough to stay with him?’

‘No. I filed for divorce yesterday.’

Esther gasped.

‘Sorry if that shocks you,’ her mother shrugged.

‘It surprises me, but I’m happy. It’s about time you lived your own life.’

 

Written by Sarah Ann

December 15, 2017 at 1:51 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 3/11/17 – The Collector

with 34 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

You might have thought it would be easier to write something to one of your own photos. Not for me. I look at the photo and remember the place and the day, where we were moored, the friend we were with, the necklace she spent a fortune on in the vintage shop just across the road, the beer we drank in the evening, None of that helped with forming a story; the one I’ve come up with is definitely lacking oomph.

Thank you to Rochelle for hosting and using one of my photos this week.

 

© me

The Collector

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

Uncle John always said I’d have his collection when he died.

When I visited as a child with my mother, she scoffed at the idea. ‘She’ll never have a house big enough.’

John waved away her protestations, and showed me his latest acquisition. Mother fretted about me breaking something. ‘She’s very careful,’ he’d say. ‘She’s a delicate touch.’

True to his word he left me the lot, house included, and a note. ‘Do with it as you wish. If you want to sell, sell.’ And with that freedom I have kept his home intact, in time to pass to another.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

November 3, 2017 at 3:30 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 2/6/17 – Retrospective

with 24 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

On seeing this week’s photo I knew immediately what I was going to write about, as the below stems from something that happened to a close friend. Unfortunately, work and travel have meant it’s taken me a while to get it down.

With thanks to Rochelle for hosting and Karuna for the photo.

 

© Karuna

Retrospective

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

I thought I’d outsmarted him.

Forty years on, I can’t remember why he did it.

I can feel my impotence, anger, sadness at watching my young life’s possessions go up in smoke. I stood rooted, fists clenched, chest tight, tears falling. In my head I asked why over and over, but said nothing. Father had explained the misdemeanour that caused my toys’ destruction. My psyche forgets.

Digging the foundations for a new extension, we unearthed the precious things I’d buried to keep from him. The past flooded back to taint the future.

But I will not let him win again.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

June 2, 2017 at 7:10 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 5/5/17 – Dwell Not

with 20 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I stared and stared at this week’s prompt and couldn’t muster anything. Then I began to think about decay, and this strong female character turned up.

Thank you, as ever, to Rochelle for hosting and Sandra for the photo.

Copyright Sandra Crook

 

Dwell Not

(Genre: historical fiction; 100-words)

The hall’s fading splendour cuts Elsa deep. She once thought to reign here. Old Edward had favoured his cousin umpteenth times removed. Until the housemaid begot his brat. None fully believed; Edward was too proud to deny.

Elsa married a different cousin, strengthening the line with six healthy children.

The housemaid died of pox. Her brat is barren, however frequently and forcibly he humps; he ages speedily. None wish to bear his scion, or bind themselves to a house that rots while he gambles.

Soon Elsa will return as widow, residing while her sons restore grandeur to house and name.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

May 5, 2017 at 5:40 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 2/10/15 – Raw

with 20 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

(No pretty froggy today.)

 

It’s ages since I’ve participated, but I hope to be able to stick around now I’m back. As I’ve been missing for so long, my writing skills will be rusty, so constructive comments are appreciated.

 

 

PHOTO PROMPT - © Marie Gail Stratford

PHOTO PROMPT – © Marie Gail Stratford

 

 

Raw (Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

There’s a photo on my wall of children giggling. It’s so vibrant that, after 30 years, I have no memory of what made them laugh, but still smile.

The pair are on the left, sunlight from the right fingering their hair. But this isn’t artfully cropped. It is raw, shot on 126mm film by my brother when photography still held surprises. We’re in the garden, taking advantage of the last days of summer.

It was three years before the film was processed. No one could explain why it hadn’t melted in the fire. He is gone; his skills remain, exposed.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

October 2, 2015 at 3:43 pm

Ligo Haibun – Midsummer

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This week’s Ligo Haibun Challenge was about midsummer. Unfortunately, the longest day in the UK was foreshortened by cloud, which led me to think of my brother in Australia experiencing their shortest day, and so family was in my mind as I attempted this week’s prompts.

‘We are back to celebrate Ligo Haibun special with you. Ligo (Jāņi), celebrated from June 23rd to June 24th, is the world’s largest festival of nature. It takes place in Latvia, and definitely outside the capital, Riga. Līgo, pronounced [Ligwa], is also the name of our Weekly Līgo Haibun Challenge, and because this week coincides with the Līgo festival, we have a Līgo special.

  • This week you are required to choose TWO of the visuals in the slideshow below, and write a haibun using each one in your haibun. The two visuals can, and should ‘interact’ in your haibun.
  • Your haibun should have ‘nature’ or an aspect of nature as a general theme.’

 

For years Martin wove and wore the largest midsummer crown; his only recognition was the knowledge and respect of the village, and the women who came to his door. As an old man, Martin was invited to lead the solstice parade, and then to light the first fire of the festivities. At the end of his life, he lived for midsummer.

Years later, Martin’s family still spearhead the celebrations. His great granddaughters entwine oak boughs with blossoms for all the village; his nephews are the nimblest over the carnival fires; his cousins sing and make merry, conducting the commemorations. And, as the day wears on, most in the village declaim their kinship with Martin.

midsummer festival

binds generations through time

consanguineous lives

 ligo-challenge_logo

Written by Sarah Ann

June 27, 2013 at 8:20 pm

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