Sarah Ann Hall

Reporting on writing in progress or, more probably, not; practising flash fiction.

Posts Tagged ‘decisions

#FridayFictioneers – 28/9/18 – A Lifetime Opportunity

with 46 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below. 

Some weeks I struggle, and then some weeks a spark fires. I’m not sure this is any good, but the idea came quickly, so much so I’ve posted on a Thursday.

Thank you to Rochelle and Yvette for this week’s rapidly stimulating photo.

 

© Yvette Prior

 

A Lifetime Opportunity

(Genre: speculative fiction)

Roll up. Roll up. Help yourself to the tipple of your choice. Honest to god these are no catch freebies. Pick a flavour. Choose a size. Opt for the adventure you most desire.

Do you want to be shrunk like Alice? Would you like to float above it all like Timothy Leary? Do you need to live the effects of arsenic poisoning to enhance that novel you’re writing? Whatever your pleasure in liquid form, we can provide.

Make your selection. Sign the waiver. Nominate an honest friend to provide the antidote when required.

Imbibe.

No responsibility accepted for bad decisions.

 

 

Advertisements

Written by Sarah Ann

September 27, 2018 at 4:39 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 27/4/18 – On the Edge

with 62 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

After leaving me wanting last week, my muse is back in play and came up with the story/ vignette/ dialogue below quite quickly, hence my posting on Thursday.

And if I may beg your indulgence, a story I wrote for the  The Blank Page Short Story Challenge has reached the Top 3 and is now being voted on by the online public. Please click http://bit.ly/sarahhallmarch18 to read my story and vote for me. Or read all and vote for the best.

 

© Jan Wayne Fields

 

On the Edge

(Genre: adventure; 100-words)

‘There’ll be something useful down there. Some shelter; water to drink.’

‘Why?’

‘Because there’s always something over the horizon.’

‘You sure?’

‘Positive. Down in that deserted valley, there’s something for us.’

‘How do you know?’

‘I’m an optimist.’

‘So you think there’ll be something.’

‘No, I know there is because the universe provides for those who ask nicely.’

‘You’re nuts.’

‘Maybe. But I’ll be even crazier if I stay on this escarpment and the sun fries the last of my brain cells.’

‘And if we don’t find anything?’

‘We’ll die and become food for the vultures. It’s a win win.’

 

 

Two for Tuesday #23 – A Mother’s Love

with 4 comments

I think I cheated with Andy’s Two for Tuesday Challenge this week. I brought my character to the brink, but didn’t make her go through with the non-standard prompt. You decide.

 

Standard Prompt:
blank canvas

You have lots of creative leeway. The limit is 200 words. The words can be used:

  • simply as a point of inspiration and do not have to be used directly
  • they can be included exactly as provided
  • or each word can be used independently of each other (for example if Death Row was the prompt instead of crafting a story about an inmate on the way to the gallows, you might write something like: Despite feeling like death from an excess of cheap vodka consumed the night before, Evelyn moved on to planting her next row of spinach).

Non-Standard Prompt:
For this week’s alternative prompt write a story about a mother who must make a hugely emotional decision about her physically disabled child. (courtesy of StoryPrompts app by Triple Dog Dare Media). As per usual with the Non-Standard Prompt there is no word limit (to allow for more in depth explorations) but there is a minimum of 200 words.

–––––

 

 

A Mother’s Love (270 words)

A baby is a tabula rasa: a lump of clay to be moulded, a blank canvas to be splashed with colour as it grows and absorbs from its parents and the people around it. Gemma was like any other baby. She cried and fed and shat in all the right places at all the right times. Or so we thought.

The first thing we noticed was her smile. It didn’t arrive on time. We waited a couple of weeks then spoke to the health visitor, the district nurse, and then the GP. Eventually it was suggested she had weak muscle tone, which would develop with time. Her lazy eye would tighten and her little lips would curl. We waited a while longer, and 10 years later we are still waiting for a definitive diagnosis.

Tim, my husband, gave up waiting. He couldn’t cope with Gemma’s lack of emotional development. His little girl didn’t love him, and he stopped loving me. I’ve struggled on for the last couple of years without him. It’s been hard coping alone with her tantrums, the head-banging, the biting, and the unpredictable days of catatonia. She’ll always be my little girl, even when she’s grown. And I will always love her, despite the lack of reciprocation. But I am alone and only I can decide what happens next.

To be honest, Gemma is too much for me and I am not enough for her. She needs constant care and I need my sleep. Even as I say I have to decide, I know there is no choice if either of us is to have a life.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

September 2, 2013 at 10:10 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 19/4/13 – Take the Rough with the Smooth

with 31 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to stimulate and inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry. Every Friday (or before) the Friday Fictioners post their 100-word stories.

Visit Rochelle’s site for the rules on how to join in and check out the other stories by clicking on the blue guy.

 

 

Take the Rough with the Smooth (100 words)

Ted made decisions on the throw of a dice. Ellie trusted the runes. Vera let pebbles choose her fate – smooth for yes, rough for no. She was never the one to pick for fear of influencing the selection.

Vera carried a drawstring bag, asking others to withdraw a stone when required. Once someone had participated, they knew the rules and couldn’t be asked again. When she had petitioned all her friends, Vera entreated acquaintances.

Her village was small, with a limited pool of strangers, and the time was fast approaching when Vera would have to make a decision for herself.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

April 19, 2013 at 7:26 pm

%d bloggers like this: