Sarah Ann Hall

Reporting on writing in progress or, more probably, not.

Posts Tagged ‘100-word story

#FridayFictioneers – 23/2/18 – Love is…

with 16 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I’ve gone for a bit of schmaltz this week, at least I hope I have. And as I can’t do too sweet, a second version is less saccharine. Only the last two lines of the below differ, but I hope they change the mood and feel enough.

Thank you to Rochelle for hosting and Marie Gail for this week’s prompt.

© Marie Gail Stratford

 

Love is…

(Genre: schmaltz; 100-words)

A glass-fronted mahogany display cabinet hangs on the wall. Inside, a silver vase holds grey, withered blooms.

‘Granny,’ says Simon, ‘why do you keep those dead flowers on the wall?’

Sylvia smiles wistfully. ‘That vase holds my life,’ she says. ‘There’s a marigold from the first posy your grandfather gave me; a rose from our wedding bouquet; a carnation from the flowers my sister sent when your mother was born; a lily from my mother’s funeral wreath.’

‘It’s not your whole life though, granny. I haven’t given you birthday flowers yet.’

Simon grins; Sylvia twinkles, and hugs her grandson tight.

 

Love is… (2)

(Genre: schmaltz with sting; 100-words)

A glass-fronted mahogany display cabinet hangs on the wall. Inside, a silver vase holds grey, withered blooms.

‘Granny,’ says Simon, ‘why do you keep those dead flowers on the wall?’

Sylvia smiles wistfully. ‘That vase holds my life,’ she says. ‘There’s a marigold from the first posy your grandfather gave me; a rose from our wedding bouquet; a carnation from the flowers my sister sent when your mother was born; a lily from my mother’s funeral wreath.’

‘It’s not your whole life though, granny. We haven’t had your funeral flowers yet.’

Simon grins; Sylvia frowns, and hugs her grandson tight.

 

 

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#FridayFictioneers – 16/2/18 – Waiting for Spring

with 30 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

Thank you to Dale for this week’s prompt, although I say that having stared hard and not got very far very fast. I think my story might stand without the photo. Thanks too to Rochelle for hosting.

Because of commitments this weekend I will be late to read and comment, but I will get there.

 

© Dale Rogerson

Waiting for Spring

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

The snow saved her. She had never been so pleased to see a whiteout. She would get it when the thaw came, but she would have worked out a story by then.

If the frost lasted long enough she might even be able to convince her father that his prize peonies had rotted of their own accord, that the ice had cut its sharp edges through their stems.

She couldn’t tell the truth; that she had pruned harshly because he wouldn’t let her attend the school disco. He wouldn’t understand.

She hated winter, and hoped for a long cold one.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

February 16, 2018 at 10:53 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 9/2/18 – Dreams of the Future

with 34 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I stared and stared at the prompts of the previous two weeks and came up with nothing. This week has been more successful in terms of words produced, albeit slightly depressing ones.

Thank you to Rochelle for hosting and JS Brand for this week’s photo.

 

© JS Brand

Dreams of the Future

(Genre: speculative fiction; 100-words)

With waters rising daily, earth turned to swamp, and gradually disappeared. People adapted, building high, and then on stilts. Homes pitched and swayed in the wind, but held firm, woven together with wire and grasses: their flexibility, their strength.

Boats rafted out from jetties in their tens, then their hundreds. Only the sure-footed would endure, needing to jump across slippery decks to reach the vanishing land in their searches for drinking water and land to cultivate.

Those who despaired were found floating each morning. Survivors clung to their belief in lost hope in favour of the suggestion of selective extermination.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

February 9, 2018 at 3:26 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 19/1/18 – Indubitable

with 47 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I’m not at all sure about the below story. The idea is sound; I feel I failed in the execution as I’ve not had the time to edit I’d’ve liked. Critique away.

© J Hardy Carroll

 

Indubitable

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

Adele was born ten minutes before Sue.

They shared school, friends, clothes, growing pains, boyfriends.

Love and marriage divided them when job and husband took them to different ends of the country. Post and phone united them as they relayed new experiences in food and music. Some believed they communicated telepathically, which explained how Sue knew Adele was pregnant before she did.

Throughout life they found it almost impossible to argue, always knowing what the other thought and why.

Now, as Adele holds Sue’s hand, watching her fluttering eyelids, she wonders how she’ll survive when Sue’s chest ceases to rise.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

January 19, 2018 at 8:39 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 12/1/18 – Marital Bliss

with 47 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I have struggled since Wednesday trying to come up with a story for this week’s photo. I thought specimens, scrutiny, being under examination, and then I showed the prompt to my other half and he saw the corner of a restaurant.

Thank you to Rochelle for hosting and Victor and Sarah Potter for this week’s photo.

 

© Victor and Sarah Potter

Marital Bliss

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

Months I’ve waited for this table. I told them it was a special occasion and they said they’d pull out all the stops at this fanciest place in town so my wife and I could celebrate our thirtieth anniversary in style. So why am I sitting at a table squeezed in between the toilet entrance and the fire exit? Talk about filthy. I wonder whether the spiders are de rigeur or an environmentally friendly form of cockroach prevention.

Thankfully the wine is good, as I will be drinking a lot of it. The wife’s in Antigua with my best friend.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

January 12, 2018 at 3:12 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 5/1/18 – (In)Substantial

with 47 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

I think I’m stuck in a semi-autobiographical rut. I wrote a story for last week’s prompt all about spinning plates, and ran out of time to post it. I have to say, I’m a much more linear-thinking person than my protagonist below.

© Roger Bultot

(In)Substantial

(Genre: general fiction; 100-words)

Her life is a notice board of lists and torn out articles, held together with pins and tangles of string. It confuses everyone but her: the whorls of disparate events and their non-interconnectedness. It is the only way she can make sense of the world.

Linear is shaky, too straightforward and can be pushed off course by the slightest collision. Single gossamer threads break easily. Nets and webs allow for movement, change, adaptation.

She knows life didn’t used to be this complicated, but forgets when it became so. This is how she copes: loops and convolutions leading to clear sightedness.

 

 

Written by Sarah Ann

January 5, 2018 at 2:36 pm

#FridayFictioneers – 22/12/17 – The Crystal Caves

with 25 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry.

At any point during the following week, the Friday Fictioneers post their 100-word tales. Read the other stories by clicking below.

Thank you to Rochelle for hosting and Björn for this week’s photo. Happy Christmas everyone. I will get round to reading and commenting, but imagine I’ll be even later than usual over the coming days….

 

 

The Crystal Caves

(Genre: you decide; 100-words)

‘Twas a spectacular sight: light shining, bouncing, dancing.

Health and safety dictated: Everyone entering the cavern must wear a hardhat.

Visitors were counted in and out by hats returned.

‘There are 15 missing this month,’ Sergei said.

‘We must stop people going in.’

‘We don’t advertise. I’ve taken the signposts down. Word about its beauty still spreads.’

‘We’ll close; lock the gates.’

‘People would break in, take souvenirs. It might take more of them.’

‘At least I wouldn’t know how many had gone.’

Erica finally understood her parents’ reluctance to expand the generations old family business, and mourned their disappearance.

 

Written by Sarah Ann

December 22, 2017 at 4:17 pm

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