Sarah Ann Hall

Reporting on writing in progress or, more probably, not.

#FridayFictioneers – 6/9/13 – All That Glisters

with 30 comments

Every Wednesday Rochelle Wisoff-Fields publishes a photo prompt to stimulate and inspire writers to write 100-words of flash fiction or poetry. The Friday Fictioneers then post their stories.

Visit Rochelle’s site for more detail on how to join in. Read other stories inspired by the prompt by clicking on the blue guy.

 

 

All that Glisters (100 words)

They’ve gone now; the relatives who picked the house clean. Auntie Jo took the silver tea-set, Maggie the Sevres porcelain. Uncles Mick and Shaun argued about the flatware, before deciding six of everything was enough for anyone. The remaining females dismissed most of the jewellery, while the males sulked over the car. Each vulture reverted to stereotypical scavenger.

‘Have fun with the rest,’ Magnus smirked as they departed, each thinking they had the cream. I have a house to clear and a shelf full of Gran’s keepsakes. Each one carries the story of its discovery, and rich memories of her.

 

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Written by Sarah Ann

September 6, 2013 at 8:58 pm

30 Responses

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  1. Wow, sounds like my family! But I think she got the best stuff.

    JackieP

    September 6, 2013 at 9:12 pm

    • Oh families, don’t you just love ’em! Yes, memories and stories triumph over material things.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 10:25 am

  2. great story, very real. 🙂

    kz

    September 7, 2013 at 9:42 am

  3. Dear Sarah,

    This story rings all too true. In the end, Magnus seems to understand what’s truly important. Good for him. And good for you for writing a such a lovely story.

    shalom,

    Rochelle

    rochellewisoff

    September 7, 2013 at 10:51 am

    • Thanks Rochelle. It’s a pity if rings true for so many. If only we valued the time with our relatives and not their things. Of course, some relatives can be truly horrible, but that’s another story. 🙂

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 11:36 am

  4. Hi Sarah Ann,
    Love that word, glister. Had to look it up. Thanks for improving my vocabulary. Very well told story and great lesson here that value is not always material in nature. Ron

    bridgesareforburning

    September 7, 2013 at 3:21 pm

    • Hi Ron,
      I’m glad I got you seaching in the dictionary. I’m afraid the title is an example of my pedantry. Once I learnt the saying was, ‘All that glisters,’ not glitters, I had to use the correct one. It’s the same for the Robbie Burns’, ‘The best laid schemes o’ mice an’ men,’ not plans. Right, off to crawl back into my box now. 🙂

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 11:40 am

  5. Not long ago I went through something similar. Your story hit home.

    lewis cave

    September 7, 2013 at 5:32 pm

    • I hope it wasn’t too traumatic for you. The relatives we see at times of crisis aren’t necessarily the ones we recognise or want to know.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 11:41 am

  6. Blind greed masks the real treasure here. Glad there was one who noticed. Nicely written!

    denmother

    September 8, 2013 at 12:55 pm

  7. Wow!What a sharp story-in just 100 words-the line said that said it all for me was,” Each vulture reverted to stereotypical scavenger.”So very true-most people see the “,material” gold ,forgetting that the real gems are in the memories woven in small trinkets & of course the heart!Loved the ending too Sarah!,

    atrm61

    September 8, 2013 at 2:16 pm

    • Thank you. With the stereotypical scavengers I was trying to describe that the women were after the jewels and the men disappointed there was only one car to fight over. I’m not sure that came across. Glad you enjoyed.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:01 pm

  8. This is what I would want.

    lingeringvisions by Dawn

    September 8, 2013 at 5:12 pm

  9. Those boxes hold treasures of memory more precious than material things.

    tedstrutz

    September 8, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    • Indeed they do. Now we need to sit Rochelle down and let her tell us the story of each object. 🙂

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:03 pm

  10. Nice, Sarah! Yes, she got the treasure all right. There’s nothing more precious than the keepsakes. They can have the flatware.

    The Bumble Files

    September 8, 2013 at 8:58 pm

  11. This is scary.. how heritage change humans to vultures… but at the end of the day… the memories carry the value.

    Björn Rudberg (brudberg)

    September 8, 2013 at 9:34 pm

    • It is amazing that the scent of money can change people so much. I agree memories have real value.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:05 pm

  12. And to their own boxes they will eventually be consigned. Great work.

    Aloha,

    Doug

    dmmacilroy

    September 9, 2013 at 10:43 am

    • Too true. And then the next generation will be picking over the spoils. What a delightful picture?

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:06 pm

  13. Vulture sounds like such a fitting description for the family members picking clean the house. I like Magnus’s idea, with the keepsakes that hold lots of memories.

    zookyworld

    September 9, 2013 at 11:07 am

    • We must be thankful the vultures only picked the house clean. 😉 Thanks for reading.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:09 pm

  14. I think pretty much happens in every family. You nailed it. A very well written piece, Sarah Ann.

    rgayer55

    September 9, 2013 at 5:13 pm

    • Thank you Russell. Although I’m not sure well written is right. Having read a couple of comments, I realise my last para is confusing. I wrote Magnus as one of the departing vultures, but others see him as the one who keeps the memories. I need to be clearer (and edit better) next time.

      Sarah Ann

      September 9, 2013 at 8:08 pm


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